D&D Halloween homebrew Rogue Table Top

This is Halloween: Roguish Archetype: The Jinx

Ah, the last of the non-adventures. Much like Cheech Marin said in Ghostbusters II, “better late than never.” The last class I submitted an idea for was for the Rogue. Rogues seemed like a natural fit for the “trick or treat” portion of Halloween. I wanted to create something that felt like the mean-spirited prankster that often rears its ugly head on Halloween. You know the type. The people that egg houses, toilet paper trees, silly string younger kids, and maybe chagnge school signs to say something about butts or poop. After reading that sentence you probably either laughed, because it was you, or said something to the effect of “fuckin’ Jason” (because it’s always a Jason.)

To capture that spirit, I wanted to come up with something that preyed upon bad luck and proactively “tricked” the opposition. A finite amount of magical options would cover that pretty well, and blend the rogue a touch with some of the warlock themes, while still letting them do their own thing.

Jinx

Your penchant for mischief has not gone unnoticed. While playing a prank one evening, you were approached by someone who asked you if you would like a little power in exchange for continuing to do what you are already doing. Since that evening, your ability to trick and frustrate friend and foe alike has reached new heights. You still aren’t sure whether that figure was good or evil, but as long as it supports a little chaos, what does it matter?

Fate Broker

Beginning at third level, you have learned to hoard small instances of fate and dole them out at your leisure. You begin with one fate point, and may accumulate up to your rogue level in fate points. Taking a long rest resets your fate points to one. Fate points are accumulated each time someone within line of sight is critically hit, or critically misses. You may also decide to receive two fate points in exchange for turning one of your critical hits into a normal hit, or allowing a normal hit to critically hit you.

The Blackrock

Objects of great luck and terrible misfortune are common in tales and adventures. Beginning at third level, you can temporarily imbue an item with your accumulated strands of fate. You may imbue an object with your fate points. For each fate point imbued in an object, the object turns the bearer’s luck against them. The first person besides the rogue to possess the object finds they are subject to the bane spell as long as they possess the object. Once the bearer of the object discards or loses the item, she becomes subject to Disadvantage on a number of skill checks, saving throws, or attack rolls equal to the number of fate points imbued in the item.

No weapons or objects larger than a small statue may be imbued by this power.

 

Bad Day

The deal with the figure has left you knowledgeable of how to really and truly ruin someone’s day. When you choose this archetype at third level, any time you successfully sneak attack an opponent, they must make a successful Intelligence saving throw (DC 8 + Dexterity Modifier + your proficiency bonus) or have Disadvantage on their next attack roll, ability check, or saving throw. Imposing this condition requires one fate point.

 

Stop Hitting Yourself

You have mastered one of the time honored, annoying abilities, the ability to make people hit someone other than you, when they really, really want to hit you. Beginning at ninth level, as an action, you are able to prepare an area within 120 feet with the hellish rebuke spell. The base area of this spell is a ten foot by ten foot square that is triggered when an enemy in the area attacks an ally within sixty feet of the area. The enemy must make a Dexterity saving throw (DC 8 + Dexterity Modifier + your proficiency bonus) , or suffer 2d10 fire damage. The enemy takes half as much damage on a successful save. Once triggered, this area persists until the end of your next turn.

For each fate point spent, you may either expand the area by an adjacent five foot by five foot square, increase the duration of the persistent area by one round, or increase the damage of the spell by 1d10. You may spend fate points on all three, but each fate point spent only allows one of the three to occur, not all three.

Once used, you may not use this ability again without taking a long rest.

 

Anopponentsayswhat? 

Confounding and confusing verbal opponents since childhood, you have taken that expertise to turn it upon those that now oppose you. At thirteenth level, you are able to prepare an area within 120 feet with the confusion spell as an action. The base area of this spell is a ten foot by ten foot square that is triggered by the first enemy to walk into the area, targeting only that enemy and lasting until the end of your opponent’s next turn, rather than being a concentration effect. Targets may make a successful Wisdom saving throw (DC 8 + Dexterity Modifier + your proficiency bonus) to be unaffected by this trap. Affected subject may attempt to save against this effect with Advantage at the end of their turn.

For each fate point spent, you may either expand the area by an adjacent five foot by five foot square, remove the Advantage that opponents have on their saving throw, or you may increase the duration of the spell by one round. You may spend fate points on all three, but each fate point spent only allows one of the three to occur, not all three.

Once used, you may not use this ability again without taking a long rest.

 

I Know You Are

But what am I? The greatest trick you can pull is letting people think you are feeling the adverse effects of their attacks, when really you are perfectly fine…and someone else is affected instead. Starting at 17th level, you may select an enemy within line of sight. As a reaction, you may attempt to send any damage and condition received from an attack to your opponent. The opponent must succeed on a successful Intelligence saving throw (DC 8 + Dexterity Modifier + your proficiency bonus) to be unaffected by this ability. If the opponent succeeds, the damage and conditions are not transferred.

Once first used, you may spend one fate point to use this ability again in subsequent rounds. You may spend three fate points to target a second opponent with this ability.

Once used, you may not use this ability again without taking a long rest.

 

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